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Fixing Australian politics and bringing Australia back from ezfka


Totes
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Is it even possible?

Maybe some here don't even want to?

What's Australia look like in 50, 100 years?

How can it be done?

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bjw678
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Most if not all here would love to see a change for the better.

They are also realists and know that is unlikely and extremely difficult to achieve.

So they are also looking to understand how things are to benefit from the same.

If I may boldly speak for everyone. 

 

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Totes
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I'm pretty much the same. I'd rather save my country's future, than reap the spoils of destroying our own kids futures. Especially given the gains we're making are shallow BS compared to what we're losing. 

As you know, I strongly disagree it can't be done. 

Noting, most Australians don't like where we're heading. Once most people hear Labor are a core problem, they get it. Hanson would be PM if she had a brain. 

I maintain destruction of Labor is key to a solution and that might be possible in key seats via social media, rumour, and alternatives to vote for. 

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bjw678
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@totes If hanson had a brain she'd have the profile of sustainable australia or other similar parties likely to attempt to effect some sort of change. She has the profile she has because she is a useful idiot.

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Totes
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@bjw678

I agree. She had the entire nation's ear, and an enormous amount of support. 

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stagmal
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i'm not so sure it can be done, at least intentionally. the average australian supports the real estate economy too much. australians don't want lower house prices. go on the FB of the ABC or any news outlet's comment section on an article about real estate and start talking about this and you'll be met with an army of people attacking you.

 

australians for the most part don't care about immigration either. i dont care what the polls say, many of them have zero interest in the issue, or its so down the list of their concerns it doesnt matter. many also support it and consider a high migration intake as fair and just policy.

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Totes
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@stagmal

My overwhelming experience with peoples' opinion on immigration is they are strongly opposed to it.

Not sure about housing. I don't think the average housing bull understands the dynamics. They just think they're geniuses for being such savvy investors. 

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stagmal
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@totes they mightn't like it, but they don't seem to consider it important enough to affect their voting patterns.

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bjw678
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@stagmal Not to the point of voting in an unknown to then run everything anyway.

If you are looking at any of the known major parties how do you vote against immigration?

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stagmal
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@bjw678 true enough, but you'd think if immigration was so important to australians there'd be at least *some* leeway with an immigration restrictionist party. there's no electoral representation at all for one.

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bjw678
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@stagmal Racist has been a very effective shutdown of anti immigration for a long time. Blowback is appearing now though.

And realistically most people don't care about politics much at all and just go tick a box every few years.

Oh, and PH One nation is a thing.

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Totes
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@bjw678

Australia desperately wants to vote against it IMO. 

Below: Refer to the election result map. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_Australian_federal_election

Below: An outstanding account of what is unfolding in the burbs. 

https://tapri.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Big-Australia-finalV6.pdf

The disaster is, that effort/anger/rebellion is resulting in perpetual LNP governments. 

Surely if those seats were given someone else to vote for they'd do it.

Meaning, LNP are weakened or are even pushed into minority government. 

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stagmal
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does anyone know what one nation's stance on immigration even is anymore?

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Totes
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@stagmal

Anti mus, anything else goes it seems. They've had ample opportunity to nobble LNP on the annual 400k plus LNP and Labor want to bring in.

Bowen...."Labor needs to better articulate the benefits of freer trade, immigration and global engagement"....

Just scum aren't they!!!!

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bjw678
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Posted by: @totes

Surely if those seats were given someone else to vote for they'd do it.

I guarantee that there was "someone else to vote for" in those seats already.

Those people are an unknown without any serious promotion or ability to change anything. That's the point.

 

Refer to the election result map. 

What i see is something like 85% of first preference votes going to coalition, labor and greens. 

Doesn't seem like people screaming for an alternative to me.

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Totes
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@bjw678

..."I guarantee that there was "someone else to vote for" in those seats already"...

There are tens of candidates in most seats. Uncoordinated, no plan, no one knows who they are, throwing preferences all over the place. 

..."Those people are an unknown without any serious promotion or ability to change anything. That's the point"....

Absolutely. That's what needs to change. 

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bjw678
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@totes

There are tens of candidates in most seats. Uncoordinated, no plan, no one knows who they are, throwing preferences all over the place. 

That's what needs to change. 

That's what the system prevents.

That sort of organisation requires effort. Lots of effort, which ultimately requires money. lots of money.

That is why the organised and publicised parties are those pushing corporate and 0.1% interests.

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Totes
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@bjw678

Sure it takes effort, but IMO we're getting to a point where there's enough people looking to vote away from LNP/Labor and enough people like me willing to put time and effort into helping them find a way. 

I'm not saying I know how to do it; after all, that's what my original post is about. 

...."Is it even possible?

Maybe some here don't even want to?

What's Australia look like in 50, 100 years?

How can it be done?"....

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Peachy
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Posted by: @bjw678

What i see is something like 85% of first preference votes going to coalition, labor and greens. 

Doesn't seem like people screaming for an alternative to me.

But that’s the trick, see - people think that they have alternatives and are exercising them and so the votes get split between the LIB, LAB and GRab manifestations of the EZFKA political singularity. 

it is very effective. 

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